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A civil rights lawyer is signaling a trial in the new legislatures

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A civil rights lawyer is signaling a trial in the new legislatures

Veteran civil rights attorney Carol Rhodes of Hazelhurst said Tuesday that talks are under way on whether to file a lawsuit challenging 174 state legislatures for reducing Mississippi’s electoral population.

Rhodes, who has spent decades trying to allow black voters to elect candidates of their choice, said the NAACP, the Southern Poverty Law Center, the American Civil Liberties Union and others are still debating whether to challenge the redistribution plan approved by the legislature. 2022 declared unconstitutional.

“Additional constituencies need to be created so that black voters can choose the candidates of their choice,” Rhodes said on Tuesday during a virtual media presentation of several lawyers involved in the district’s relocation lawsuit across the country.

During the 2022 session, the Mississippi legislature adopted a plan to relocate the status quo areas, Rhodes said. According to the plan, 42 of the state’s 122 constituencies are majority African-American, while 15 of the Senate’s 52 constituencies have a majority black population.

The redistribution plan was approved despite the fact that, according to the 2020 U.S. Census, the state’s non-white population has grown over the past 10 years, while the state’s white population has declined significantly.

According to the 2020 census, the Mississippi white population has shrunk by 95,791 to 1,658,893 over the past 10 years. During the same period, the black population has shrunk by only 13,940 to 1,084,481. a much smaller percentage of the state’s total population compared to white and African-American populations.

The percentage of Mississippi residents who identify themselves as non-exclusively white or African-American was 3.85% in 2010 and now stands at 7.36%, according to the census.

According to a plan approved by the legislature and before a possible federal court, 29% of Senate constituencies are majority African-American and 34% are House constituencies. According to the 2020 census, the state’s African-American or partially African-American population is 38% and white is 59%.

During a media presentation, Rhodes said a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the district redistribution plan approved by the legislature for four U.S. House counties is ongoing. No one is sure that the federal panel of three judges considering the lawsuit in Congress will decide before the 2022 election. The party’s primary elections on the spot in the House of Representatives will take place on June 7. The general election is scheduled for November.

Rhodes, who represents the NAACP in a U.S. congressional lawsuit to relocate the district, said there is still time to decide whether to challenge the state’s new legislatures, as these elections will only take place in 2023.

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