Home Career Respondent Benny Thompson is holding a public hearing on Jan. 6

Respondent Benny Thompson is holding a public hearing on Jan. 6

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Ruben Anderson, the first African-American judge of the Mississippi Supreme Court of the modern era, was obliged to introduce former President Bill Clinton at a recent ceremony in memory of his longtime friends, the governor and first lady William and Eliza Winter.

Before making that entry, Anderson said he wanted to recognize “my congressman”. He described U.S. 2nd District MP Benny Thompson as “the most extraordinary politician you have ever met. He is not interested in wealth. He is not interested in the top position, and he avoids publicity. “

Smart people may disagree on whether Anderson was overly generous to “the guy I’ve known for over 50 years,” but what can’t be disputed is that Thompson won’t be able to avoid publicity this week.

Thompson, a Bolton-born man who has held office in Congressional 2nd since 1993, will be in the spotlight as the special committee he chairs holds prime-time hearings beginning Thursday, Jan. 6, 2021, during the attack on US Capitol. those trying to thwart the attestation of the 2020 presidential election. Much of the committee’s work has centered around the role of former President Donald Trump and his allies in the attack.

READ MORE: MP Benny Thompson has been appointed to head the January 6 riot committee

Thursday’s hearing will begin at 7 p.m., and a separate hearing next week will be broadcast live on most major networks and cable news channels – with the exception of Fox News.

“I want, as an African-American, to be able to tell the world that I helped stabilize our government when the rebels tried to seize it,” Thompson said. recently told CNN hearings.

Thompson, the dean of a delegation to the Mississippi Congress and indeed one who worked to avoid attention, built his long political career on the defense of democracy.

As a young adult in the 1960s, he worked on registering African Americans to vote and to ensure the counting of votes. Now heading the commission on January 6, he is actually doing a similar job: ensuring the counting of legitimately cast votes and protecting the country’s representative democracy from any future attempts to overturn the election results.

During Fr. Mississippi Today 2018 interviewThompson recalled in the 1960s as a political science student at Tugal College, who worked in the Mississippi Delta, trying to register people to vote on behalf of civil rights icon Fanny Lou Hamer.

“I talked to my mother, and she said you knew we weren’t voting here in Bolton,” Thompson said. “It was a shock to me that I was in Sunflower County helping to register black people to vote, and even in my hometown they didn’t enjoy the same luxury.”

The father of Thompson, a car mechanic who died in 1964, the same year that the federal suffrage law was passed to ensure that racial minorities were not denied the right to vote, never received the right to vote. His mother, a schoolteacher, did so, and most likely her first vote was cast for her son when he ran and was elected to the Aldermen Council in his hometown of Bolton in 1969.

While Thompson won the election, it took the decision of the 5th U.S. District Court of Appeals to ensure victory for him and two other African-Americans elected that year in Bolton.

The commission’s hearing on Thursday, January 6, can be seen as a continuation of Benny Thompson’s life in terms of trying to ensure fair elections.

“I strongly believe that the rule of law is necessary in a democracy,” Thompson said recently said NPR. “It has nothing to do with individuals. It has nothing to do with wealth. It has nothing to do with status in the community. This is the law. The law is colorblind. “

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