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The ABA is again trying to stop LSAT requirements. Will it be delayed this time?

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 The ABA is again trying to stop LSAT requirements.  Will it be delayed this time?

Law schools may no longer need to require applicants to provide standard exam scores, including the law school entrance exam, in accordance with a recommendation being considered by the American Bar Association.

ABA will check the proposal made by one of its committees, at a public meeting later this month, although it is still subject to several levels of approval.

The abolition of mandates for entrance exams represents a seismic shift in the long-standing procedures for entering law schools. Top rated schools weigh high LSAT score when checking applicants. Until Novemberit was the only entrance test that the ABA explicitly allowed to be used by its recognized law schools.

The ABA proposal is while a national campaign to remove barriers related to testing for underrepresented college entrants has embraced student admission. Proponents of waiving LSAT requirements say it could help diversify applicants’ pools.

However, destroying a culture of admission, largely focused on LSAT scores, can be challenging. In recent years, more than 100,000 candidates have passed the LSAT each year – and law schools would not have to drop the test under the proposal. The ABA also tried to end the standardized evaluation rules in 2018, but it receded amid fears that their removal would put vulnerable entrants at a disadvantage who could confirm their academic ability with an objective measure.

What does the ABA do?

ABA Strategic Review Committee recommended the organization – which accredits about 200 U.S. law schools – change its standard by requiring a “real and reliable” entrance exam.

LSAT was the de facto choice to meet this demand, although some colleges have experimented by allowing an exam for graduate students instead. The ABA in November Green allowed all of its law schools to use the GRE.

Standard 503, as it is known in the ABA rulebook, has long been under close scrutiny, attracting accusations that it hinders law school candidates who may not fit the traditional profile.

The study is published The New York University Law Review in 2020 found that politics in recent decades has evolved into a “significant barrier to entry with a variety of negative impacts on” students from racial minorities, women, low-income entrants, and people with disabilities.

Another study, who appeared in the International University of Florida’s legal review in 2019, said the average LSAT score for black students was 142, compared to 153 for white and Asian test participants. The maximum score is 180.

This was reported in the ABA committee in a public note that the departure from the mandate eliminates “some of the problems inherent in determining which tests are actually valid and reliable for admission to law school”. It is noted that ABA remains the only accreditor among law, medical, dental, pharmaceutical, business and architectural schools that still require entrance exams.

On May 20, one of the governing bodies of the ABA, the Advocacy Legal Education Section Council, is to decide whether to open the proposal for public discussion. The committee will then review these reviews and discuss whether to offer reviews, said in an email Bill Adams, managing director of the Accreditation and Legal Education Division of ABA. Another steering group, the ABA House of Delegates, will also consider the proposal, but the final decision remains with the council, Adams said.

The date of the final policy change is uncertain.

What do people say?

According to Bob Schaefer, CEO of FairTest, an organization that advocates minimal reliance on standardized exams, the move is very important for fairness and access.

This is because the ABA and the Admissions School, or LSAC, which runs the LSAT, “have been among the most resilient to changing testing policies of all drivers to higher education,” Schaefer said in an email.

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